Announcement

Collapse

Not logged in, registered users

If you are fed up with seeing lots of adverts on Talk Angling, the way to get rid of them is REGISTER HERE as a member and then 95% of the adverts on the site will go away!
See more
See less

Help,please, from Anglers to spot Asian Hornets

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help,please, from Anglers to spot Asian Hornets

    hello everyone,

    I have joined this forum because I have been asked to seek out the assistance of UK anglers . I am a member of Torbay Bee Keepers Association and am their rep on a joint body with other Devon bee keepers formed to create first response organisation to the threat of Asian Hornets. This insect is currently spreading northwards from south west France. I guess there are bee keepers amongst the angling community and they will know if that if this insect manages to cross the Channel all our honey bees in the UK will be at risk

    Where do anglers come into this picture. Well the Asian Hornet ( Vespa Velutina is its Latin name, V.v or AH for short) prefers to make its nests high in trees that grow along rivers, canals, and lakes . Many of you who go on fishing trips to France may well have spotted nests high in trees and wondered what made them.
    These nests are the secondary nests and last into the autumn when up to 300 new queens are produced and mated and fly off to hibernating sites. During the summer the workers hornets will hawk around for any larger insects which they prey on for food. they take all sorts of insect but if they find hives they can decimate the honey bees to the point where the hive could die off completely. Honey bees are not their only prey. They take bumble bees and damsels and large hover flies, in fact any insect that will give them a good feed of protein. They bit of heads, tails, wings and legs and fly off with the middle bit which contains all the muscles which provide protein to their young in the nest.

    In early spring the new queens seek out nesting places whic are generally low down on hedges and bushes and sometimes on sheds and buildings. They need a good supply of water and dead wood to create the paper with ahich they build their nests. The firt nest is small to raise some workers, and then the colony moves to a higher location in a tree top where the nest grows in size anythin up to a meter in diameter. From here the workers fly out on their foraging trips and it is possible that they may be seen visiting the water's edge to drink.

    Anglers can help keeping a look out in late autumn and early winter for the nests high in trees as they become more visible when the leaves fall




    What does the insect look like? Well it is a very large wasp size but easily distinguished from wasps and our native hornet, Vespa Crabro, which are all mainly yellow and all are recognised easily as wasps as we know them. Vespa velutina is mainly blackish brown withan orangy face and the third segment on its abdomen is orangy yellow. It is also known as the Yellow Legged Hornet because the middle and ends of its legs are yellow, but this is not always easy to see if it is flying. The way to think about it as far as I am concerned is that if looks like a big black/brown wasp then its probably an Asian Hornet. Bu the best way to learn waht you are looking for is to look at the images you can find if you Google Vespa velutina. And then Google wasps and European Hornet and you will see the difference.



    This is the ASIAN HORNET Vespa velutina


    And this is the EUROPEAN HORNET, Vespa crabro

    If you see the insect or what you think may be its nest we would like you, if you can, to get photos and to report them to:

    alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk

    But if you are not sure and just want some advice please get in touch with your local Bee Keepers Association. On no account try to disturb the nest and be careful with the insect itself; they have a nasty sting! If you can swat one then the body is useful for identification and can be sent off to the Non Native Species Secretariat who can be found here:

    http://www.nonnativespecies.org

    Thank you for reading this

  • #2
    I have repeated the following to include the photos which did not upload for the original post


    Where do anglers come into this picture. Well the Asian Hornet ( Vespa Velutina is its Latin name, V.v or AH for short) prefers to make its nests high in trees that grow along rivers, canals, and lakes . Many of you who go on fishing trips to France may well have spotted nests high in trees and wondered what made them.

    Vespa-Velutina_nest1 copy.jpg
    These nests are the secondary nests and last into the autumn when up to 300 new queens are produced and mated and fly off to hibernating sites. During the summer the workers hornets will hawk around for any larger insects which they prey on for food. they take all sorts of insect but if they find hives they can decimate the honey bees to the point where the hive could die off completely. Honey bees are not their only prey. They take bumble bees and damsels and large hover flies, in fact any insect that will give them a good feed of protein. They bit of heads, tails, wings and legs and fly off with the middle bit which contains all the muscles which provide protein to their young in the nest.

    In early spring the new queens seek out nesting places whic are generally low down on hedges and bushes and sometimes on sheds and buildings. They need a good supply of water and dead wood to create the paper with ahich they build their nests. The firt nest is small to raise some workers, and then the colony moves to a higher location in a tree top where the nest grows in size anythin up to a meter in diameter. From here the workers fly out on their foraging trips and it is possible that they may be seen visiting the water's edge to drink.

    Anglers can help keeping a look out in late autumn and early winter for the nests high in trees as they become more visible when the leaves fall

    VV nest in Tree.jpg



    Perhaps I should point out that some people are of the opinion that Asian Hornet is not established in the UK yet, as far as we know but National Bee Unit and British Bee Keeping Associations both advise bee keepers to keep a look out for V.v just in case a queen got away from the nests found in Tetbury, Gloucestershire, and in Woolacombe, Devon in 2016 and 2017 respectively.

    It is also thought that it may be too late now at Christmas to see a nest in a tree as they will have broken up from wet and wind during the autumn: we would still like you to keep your eyes open nevertheless! When I passed over the Pyrenees last January nests were still visible in the trees n southern France and northern Spain.
    Last edited by ColinLodge; 23rd December 2017, 05:02 PM. Reason: Additional information

    Comment


    • #3
      They're not resistant to a Rolled Up Daily Star or indeed a similar Tabloid - so I've heard!!
      [B]Fishin' Best Fun Ya' Can 'ave wi' Ya' Clothes On!![/B] And Can't do with sycophants!!.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the ifo Colin.
        Although i hope i don't see any.

        Comment


        • #5
          A friend of mine in the Chester area showed me a picture of one which he walloped, it was the size of a Swan Vesta matchbox, this was during the summer.
          I just thought it was a mutant Wasp TBH.
          On the gathering storm comes a tall handsome man, in a dusty black coat and red right hand.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SPADGER View Post
            A friend of mine in the Chester area showed me a picture of one which he walloped, it was the size of a Swan Vesta matchbox, this was during the summer.
            I just thought it was a mutant Wasp TBH.
            Spadger, can you please clarify: was this an Asian Hornet or a European hornet or something bigger than either of these. and was this in Chester or on the continent?

            The Asian Hornet on the left is 38mm long and the European Hornet on the right is 43mm long. a Swan Vestas box is about 75mm long, much bigger than either of these. The only other Hornet that sort of size would be a Japanese Giant Hornet seen in this photo compared with European Hornets

            This is really important because if it was either Asian or Japanese Hornet then the National Bee Unit doesn't know about it or is keeping very quiet on the subject. Also if it was either of these and there were more of them then this could be the start of the establishment of the species in the UK that we wish to prevent.

            Comment


            • #7
              Will give him a bell when he's back from America
              On the gathering storm comes a tall handsome man, in a dusty black coat and red right hand.

              Comment


              • #8
                Please let me know of anyone who's been Brave enough to take out a nest - I'd imagine the Grubs would be a killer bait lol.
                [B]Fishin' Best Fun Ya' Can 'ave wi' Ya' Clothes On!![/B] And Can't do with sycophants!!.

                Comment

                Working...
                X