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Disappointing

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  • Disappointing

    This must be the worst ending of the river season ever, seems since early January the river has only been fishable with the temps on the minus side of zero...anything above zero, and they have been flooded ..does the rain ever stop..totally frustrating around Evesham way...whats it like where you are?

  • #2
    Rob, Thames near me has been rubbish all season. Cormorants everywhere
    John

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    • #3
      Hi rjays ditto R.Weaver been absolutely dire for months not been able fish best sections cause of high water levels bream not feeding even with colour in really strange . Cormorants everywhere def not helping been a long slow end to season glad see back of this one. Steve

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      • #4
        Seems every weekend the river has been 2ft up...the only time the level was ok was when we had the snow, and you couldn't get to it!!

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        • #5
          Know what you mean mate ive run 6 opens since xmas and no one turned up for em guessing they had enough of flooded river

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          • #6
            Originally posted by floody View Post
            Know what you mean mate ive run 6 opens since xmas and no one turned up for em guessing they had enough of flooded river
            your name dosnt instil much confidence
            [url]www.merseysideanglers.com[/url]

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            • #7
              Rather apt I must say

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              • #8
                Has been a tough one over here also,The normally fishable lough is now 14ft above its fishable height.Rivers aren't much better.
                Is there no sign of a cull on those feathery savages on the Thames?

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                • #9
                  Big Dave and rjays . Your both right probably doesnt ha ha and if i tell you that im a plumber also couldnt have picked a better trade lol

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Fott View Post
                    Has been a tough one over here also,The normally fishable lough is now 14ft above its fishable height.Rivers aren't much better.
                    Is there no sign of a cull on those feathery savages on the Thames?
                    Bob we fish a stretch between Bourne End and Cookham which is a mile from a Stillwater called Spade Oak Pit which is also a site of Scientific Interest and a bird sanctuary. A bird watching mate of mine said last summer it was estimated that there was a minimum of 500 nesting pairs in the trees on an island that is 500m from the bank so very safe and as I understand it they can have 4/5 youngsters at a time. One morning my mate and I started early around 6.30am and noticed three cormorants swimming downstream as we clapped our hands to imitate gunfire another 30/40 popped up and they were in a line around a metre or so apart right across the river herding the fish. I kid you not it was like a military operation. This year we have given up after having 10 blanks in a row and have contacted the EA and they are going to look into it. Not holding my breath by the way.

                    The two swims we fish are on my mates garden and in previous years we have had bags of roach on the wag and mag 8/10 bream in a morning and chub up to 6.5lbs. Now you won't see any fry in the margins and no sign of any fish topping however I'm told that if you go upstream of Spade Oak there are fish topping so wonder if the cormorants will only herd downstream it makes sense I suppose. So wonder where there next port of call will be.
                    John

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                    • #11
                      Rob for general fishing on the Lower Severn virtually finished in october
                      Colin

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lambrettasx200 View Post
                        Bob we fish a stretch between Bourne End and Cookham which is a mile from a Stillwater called Spade Oak Pit which is also a site of Scientific Interest and a bird sanctuary. A bird watching mate of mine said last summer it was estimated that there was a minimum of 500 nesting pairs in the trees on an island that is 500m from the bank so very safe and as I understand it they can have 4/5 youngsters at a time. One morning my mate and I started early around 6.30am and noticed three cormorants swimming downstream as we clapped our hands to imitate gunfire another 30/40 popped up and they were in a line around a metre or so apart right across the river herding the fish. I kid you not it was like a military operation. This year we have given up after having 10 blanks in a row and have contacted the EA and they are going to look into it. Not holding my breath by the way.

                        The two swims we fish are on my mates garden and in previous years we have had bags of roach on the wag and mag 8/10 bream in a morning and chub up to 6.5lbs. Now you won't see any fry in the margins and no sign of any fish topping however I'm told that if you go upstream of Spade Oak there are fish topping so wonder if the cormorants will only herd downstream it makes sense I suppose. So wonder where there next port of call will be.
                        Thats really disheartening John,With that amount of birds working in formation its simply not sustainable.There was a study done on them here in Ireland and although the numbers suggest that they are not as abundant as inland UK, they are now looked on as 'becoming a problem'..If you take into account one adult bird can eat 7-8lbs (more if they can get it)in a day those numbers suggest a complete
                        disaster is underway.
                        Im not sure what kind of revenue Thames fishing bring to the UK economy each year but if it brings in anything near what the Shannon does here,a cull will surely have to be considered at the very least.
                        I know there is talk of it here by the IFI.
                        Maybe a petition with names will get a reaction from the relevant parties?

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                        • #13
                          Bob what a lot of anglers don't realise these birds are very intelligent and you won't see them when loads of people are around they do their killing when nobody is about that's why we spotted them at 6.30am no walkers or dog walkers.

                          A couple of years ago they were patrolling a lock cut near my house because you can only fish this cut from November and anglers were getting good catches on the hemp. But once again 5/6am they were herding the roach up to the lock gates and destroying them not even eating all they had destroyed. The big problem is will the authorities risk all the negative publicity if they cull them? I don't think so
                          John

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                          • #14
                            I know the study here found they do a lot of their eating underwater,so we only see half of the carnage.The inland migration here is a relatively new phenomenon, 30-40 years.
                            But Ive never seen them in the numbers like you describe,That sounds way out of control John.The other method which is seen as a more humane way of keeping the numbers down is
                            egg pricking,and is exactly what it suggests, but it takes up a lot of resources and man hours.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bob Fott View Post
                              I know the study here found they do a lot of their eating underwater,so we only see half of the carnage.The inland migration here is a relatively new phenomenon, 30-40 years.
                              But Ive never seen them in the numbers like you describe,That sounds way out of control John.The other method which is seen as a more humane way of keeping the numbers down is
                              egg pricking,and is exactly what it suggests, but it takes up a lot of resources and man hours.
                              i bet there would be more than a few willing to take part and volunteer
                              [url]www.merseysideanglers.com[/url]

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